Supported by: NHS

Toby Foster talks back pain. Click on You Tube symbol to watch in full screen

Acute back pain

Acute back pain is usually caused by a sprain or strain in the back. It is so common it should be seen as an annoying but normal part of life.

80% of the adult population in this country will have a significant episode of back pain in their life. Around 10% of the population have back pain at any one time.

It can come on quite suddenly, or over time, and can be caused by lifting or moving awkwardly.

However, more often than not, acute back pain comes on without any specific injury to your back.

The pain can come on suddenly, or over time and can range from a mild pain or ache to quite severe pain, which can be extremely distressing and can sometimes stop you carrying out your everyday activities.

You will often hear that the best thing you can do for back pain is to lie down and rest - just one of several back pain myths which you can find out more about by clicking on the link to the right.